HAIL & FIRE - a resource for Reformed and Gospel Theology in the works, exhortations, prayers, and apologetics of those who have maintained the Gospel and expounded upon the Scripture as the Eternal Word of God and the sole authority in Christian doctrine.
HAIL & FIRE - a resource for Reformed and Gospel Theology in the works, exhortations, prayers, and apologetics of those who have maintained the Gospel and expounded upon the Scripture as the Eternal Word of God and the sole authority in Christian doctrine.


NOTE: These works have been selected for the purity of their Gospel message and for the authors' witness to the power of the Gospel, of repentance, and of a new life. The main theme of each of these works is the absolute necessity of godliness; for, as Scriptures declares, "pursue peace with all men, and holiness, without which no man shall see the Lord," Heb 12:14. It is always to be remembered that every writer is but a fallible man and an earthern vessel and we, therefore, must test all things (1 Thes 5:21) against the pure light of Scripture: "all Scripture, is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, thoroughly equipped for every good work" 2 Tim 3:16. "Test all things: hold fast that which is good." 1 Thes 5:21.
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Jonathan Edwards
Puritan and Revivalist Preacher
(1703-1758)

Jonathan Edwards, Puritan and Revivalist Preacher, 1703-1758

"False affections do not go deep enough to reach and govern the spring of menís actions and practice. But gracious affections go to the very bottom of the heart and take hold of the very inmost springs of life and activity."

Religious Affections

Jonathan Edwards
(Puritan and 18th century Revivalist Preacher, 1703-1758)

"Religious Affections" by Jonathan Edwards:

Full book text:
open book file  H&F_Edwards(Jonathan)_ReligiousAffections.pdf 935KB

EXCERPT from "Religious Affections" on Distinguishing Signs of Truly Gracious and Holy Affections:

"I come now to the second thing appertaining to the trial of religious affections, which was proposed, viz., To take notice of some things, wherein those affections that are spiritual and gracious, do differ from those that are not so.

But before I proceed directly to the distinguishing characters, I would previously mention some things which I desire may be observed, concerning the marks I shall lay down.

1. That I am far from undertaking to give such signs of gracious affections, as shall be sufficient to enable any certainly to distinguish true affection from false in others; or to determine positively which of their neighbors are true professors, and which are hypocrites. In so doing, I should be guilty of that arrogance which I have been condemning. Though it be plain that Christ has given rules to all Christians, to enable them to judge of professors of religion, whom they are concerned with, so far as is necessary for their own safety, and to prevent their being led into a snare by false teachers, and false pretenders to religion; and though it be also beyond doubt, that the Scriptures do abound with rules, which may be very serviceable to ministers, in counseling and conducting souls committed to their care, in things appertaining to their spiritual and eternal state; yet it is also evident, that it was never God's design to give us any rules, by which we may certainly know, who of our fellow professors are his, and to make a full and clear separation between sheep and goats; but that, on the contrary, it was God's design to reserve this to himself, as his prerogative. And therefore no such distinguishing signs as shall enable Christians or ministers to do this, are ever to be expected to the world's end: for no more is ever to be expected from any signs, that are to be found in the word of God, or gathered from it, than Christ designed them for.

2. No such signs are to be expected, that shall be sufficient to enable those saints certainly to discern their own good estate, who are very low in grace, or are such as have much departed from God, and are fallen into a dead, carnal, and unchristian frame. It is not agreeable to God's design (as has been already observed), that such should know their good estate: nor is it desirable that they should; but, on the contrary, every way best that they should not; and we have reason to bless God, that he has made no provision that such should certainly know the state that they are in, any other way than by first coming out of the ill frame and way they are in ..."

Excerpt from "Religious Affections" by Jonathan Edwards

"Test all things: hold fast that which is good." 1 Thes 5:21

"For he shall have judgment without mercy, that hath shewed no mercy; and mercy rejoiceth against judgment. What doth it profit, my brethren, though a man say he hath faith, and have not works? can faith save him? If a brother or sister be naked, and destitute of daily food, And one of you say unto them, Depart in peace, be ye warmed and filled; notwithstanding ye give them not those things which are needful to the body; what doth it profit? Even so faith, if it hath not works, is dead, being alone." Jam 2:13-17 KJV
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