HAIL & FIRE - a resource for Reformed and Gospel Theology in the works, exhortations, prayers, and apologetics of those who have maintained the Gospel and expounded upon the Scripture as the Eternal Word of God and the sole authority in Christian doctrine.
HAIL & FIRE - a resource for Reformed and Gospel Theology in the works, exhortations, prayers, and apologetics of those who have maintained the Gospel and expounded upon the Scripture as the Eternal Word of God and the sole authority in Christian doctrine.


NOTE: These works have been selected for the purity of their Gospel message and for the authors' witness to the power of the Gospel, of repentance, and of a new life. The main theme of each of these works is the absolute necessity of godliness; for, as Scriptures declares, "pursue peace with all men, and holiness, without which no man shall see the Lord," Heb 12:14. It is always to be remembered that every writer is but a fallible man and an earthern vessel and we, therefore, must test all things (1 Thes 5:21) against the pure light of Scripture: "all Scripture, is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, thoroughly equipped for every good work" 2 Tim 3:16. "Test all things: hold fast that which is good." 1 Thes 5:21.
HOME > Library > Books > List of works by Hugh Binning (Puritan)
Click to open the Hail & Fire Audio Player.

EXCERPT from "Christian Love" by Hugh Binning:

"Charity 'is not easily provoked,' 1 Cor. 13:5. This is the straight and solid firmness of it, that it is not soon moved with external impressions. It is long suffering, it suffers long and much. It will not be shaken by violent and weighty pressures of injuries, where there is much provocation given, yet it is not provoked. Now to complete it, it is not easily provoked at light offences. It is strange how little a spark of injuries puts all in a flame because our spirits are as gunpowder, - so capable of combustion through corruption. How ridiculous, for the most part, are the causes of our wrath! For light things we are heavily moved, and for ridiculous things sadly, even as children who fall out among themselves for toys and trifles, or as beasts that are provoked upon the very show of a color, as red or such like. We would save ourselves much labor, if we could judge before we suffer ourselves to be provoked. But now we follow the first appearance of wrong, and being once moved from without, we continue our commotion within, lest we should seem to be angry without a cause. But charity hath a more solid foundation. It dwells in God, for God is love, and so is truly great, truly high, and looks down with a steadfast countenance upon these lower things. The upper world is continually calm and serene. No clouds, no tempests there, no winds, nothing to disturb the harmonious and uniform motion, but it is this lower world that is troubled and tossed with tempests, and obscured with clouds. So a soul dwelling in God by love, is exalted above the cloudy region. He is calm, quiet, serene, and is not disturbed or interrupted in his motion of love to God or men.

Charity 'thinketh no evil,' 1 Cor. 13:5. Charity is apt to take all things in the best sense. If a thing may be subject to diverse acceptations, it can put the best construction on it. It is so benign and good in its own nature that it is not inclinable to suspect others. It desires to condemn no man, but would gladly, as far as reason and conscience will permit, absolve every man. It is so far from desire of revenge, that it is not provoked or troubled with an injury. For that were nothing else but to wrong itself because others have wronged it already, and it is so far from wronging others, that it will not willingly so much as think evil of them. Yet if need require, charity can execute justice, and inflict chastisement, not out of desire of anotherís misery, but out of love and compassion to mankind. 'Charitas non punit quia peccatum est, sed ne peccaretur,' it looks more to prevention of future sin, than to revenge of a bypast fault, and can do all without any discomposure of spirit, as a physician cuts a vein without anger. 'Quis enim cut medetur irascitur?' 'Who is angry at his own patient?'

Charity 'rejoiceth not in iniquity,' 1 Cor. 13:6. Charity is not defiled in itself, though it condescend to all. Though it can love and wish well to evil men, yet it rejoiceth not in iniquity. It is like the sunís light that shines on a dunghill, and is not defiled, receives no tincture from it. Some base and wicked spirits make a sport to do mischief themselves, and take pleasure in others that do it. But charity rejoices in no iniquity or injustice, though it were done to its own enemy. It cannot take pleasure in the unjust sufferings of any who hate it, because it hath no enemy but sin and iniquity and hates nothing else with a perfect hatred. Therefore whatever advantage should redound to itself by other menís iniquities, it cannot rejoice, that iniquity, its capital enemy, should reign and prevail. But it 'rejoiceth in the truth.' The advancement and progress of others in the way of truth and holiness is its pleasure. Though that should eclipse its own glory, yet it looks not on it with an evil eye. If it can find out any good in them that are enemies to it, it is not grieved to find it and know it, but can rejoice at any thing which may give ground of good construction of them. There is nothing more beautiful in its eyes than to see every one get their own due, though it alone should come behind.

Charity 'beareth all things,' 1 Cor. 13:7. By nature we are undaunted heifers, cannot bear any thing patiently. But charity is accustomed to the yoke, - to the yoke of reproaches and injuries from others, to a burden of other menís infirmities and failings. We would all be borne upon othersí shoulders, but we cannot put our own shoulders under other menís burden, according to that royal law of Christ, Rom. 15:1. 'We that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves' and Gal. 6:2, 'Bear ye one anotherís burdens, and so fulfil the law of Christ,' that is the law of love, no question."

Excerpt from Christian Love" by Hugh Binning

Hugh Binning
(Puritan 1627-1653)

"Christian Love" by Hugh Binning

EXCERPT: "Charity 'thinketh no evil,' 1 Cor. 13:5. Charity is apt to take all things in the best sense. If a thing may be subject to diverse acceptations, it can put the best construction on it. It is so benign and good in its own nature that it is not inclinable to suspect others. It desires to condemn no man, but would gladly, as far as reason and conscience will permit, absolve every man. It is so far from desire of revenge, that it is not provoked or troubled with an injury. For that were nothing else but to wrong itself because others have wronged it already, and it is so far from wronging others, that it will not willingly so much as think evil of them. Yet if need require, charity can execute justice, and inflict chastisement, not out of desire of anotherís misery, but out of love and compassion to mankind. 'Charitas non punit quia peccatum est, sed ne peccaretur,' it looks more to prevention of future sin, than to revenge of a bypast fault, and can do all without any discomposure of spirit, as a physician cuts a vein without anger. 'Quis enim cut medetur irascitur?' 'Who is angry at his own patient?'"

Full text of "Christian Love"   Read Book online: Christian Love by Hugh Binning

"The Common Principles of the Christian Religion, Clearly Proved, and Singularly Improved" or "A Practical Catechism" by Hugh Binning

EXCERPT: ďEnter in at the strait gate, but walk not in the broad way where many walk, for it leads to destruction.Ē Therefore I would have this persuasion once begotten in your souls, that the course of this world, - the way of the most part of men, - is dangerous, is damnable. O consider whither the way will lead you, before you go farther! Do not think it a folly to stand still now, and examine it, when you have gone on so long in their company. Stand, I say, and consider! Be not ignorant as beasts, that know no other things than to follow the drove; quae pergunt, non quo eundum est, sed quo itur; they follow not whither they ought to go, but whither most go. You are men, and have reasonable souls within you; therefore I beseech you, be not composed and fashioned according to custom and example, that is, brutish, but according to some inward knowledge and reason. Retire once from the multitude, and ask in earnest at God, What is the way? Him that fears him he will teach the way that he should choose. The way to his blessed end is very strait, very difficult; you must have a guide in it, - you must have a lamp and a light in it, - else you cannot but go wrong."

Full text of "The Common Principles of the Christian Religion"   Read Book online: The Common Principles of the Christian Religion by Hugh Binning

more to come . . .

"Owe no man any thing, but to love one another: for he that loveth another hath fulfilled the law. For this, Thou shalt not commit adultery, Thou shalt not kill, Thou shalt not steal, Thou shalt not bear false witness, Thou shalt not covet; and if there be any other commandment, it is briefly comprehended in this saying, namely, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. Love worketh no ill to his neighbour: therefore love is the fulfilling of the law." Rom 13:8-10 KJV
Copyright © Copyright Date HAIL and FIRE

COPYRIGHT NOTICE

www.hailandfire.com