CATHOLIC APOLOGETICA:

These works have been placed online so that those of a Catholic as well as a Protestant and Gospel faith might become more familiar with the points of controversy, the resources and methods, the debate itself and the manner in which the Church and her theologians have historically managed the discourse in defense of tradition and Church law over the simple faith of the Gospel that was originally preached.

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HAIL & FIRE - a resource for Reformed and Gospel Theology in the works, exhortations, prayers, and apologetics of those who have maintained the Gospel and expounded upon the Scripture as the Eternal Word of God and the sole authority in Christian doctrine.
HAIL & FIRE - a resource for Reformed and Gospel Theology in the works, exhortations, prayers, and apologetics of those who have maintained the Gospel and expounded upon the Scripture as the Eternal Word of God and the sole authority in Christian doctrine.

Click to Read On Godly Love by William Tyndale - Hail and Fire - Doctrine

Click to Read Authority of the Scripture by William Tyndale - Hail and Fire - Doctrine

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Click to Read History of England from the fall of Wosley to the death of Elizabeth by James Anthony Froude - Hail and Fire Book Library

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Religious Affections by Jonathan Edwards (1746) - find this book in the Hail and Fire Library

Religious Affections by Jonathan Edwards

Christian Love
by Hugh Binning

READ ONLINE: Certain Sermons or Homilies Appointed to Be Read in Churches in the Time of Queen Elizabeth of Famous Memory - Hail and Fire

SERMONS APPOINTED TO BE READ IN THE REIGN OF QUEEN ELIZABETH I

QUOTE: "How necessary it is, that the Word of God, which is the only food of the soul, and that most excellent light that we must walk by, in this our most dangerous pilgrimage, should at all convenient times be preached unto the people"

1562 Preface

Click to Read About the life of William Tyndale - Hail and Fire Book Library

Illustration of the Burning of English Bible Translations in 15th century England. READ LOLLARD WRITINGS online

ON BURNING BIBLES:

"When they burned the New Testament they pretended a zeal very fervent to maintain only Godís honor, which they said with protestation, was obscured by translation in English, causing much error. But the truth plainly to be said, this was the cause why they were afraid, least laymen should know their iniquity."

A Lollard (1450ad)

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READ ONLINE:
A Proper Dialogue between a Gentleman and Husbandman each complaining to other their miserable calamite, through the ambition of the clergy.

A 15th century Apology written by an English Lollard.

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Illustration of the Burning of English Bible Translations in 15th century England. READ LOLLARD WRITINGS online

HOME > Library > Books > "A New Ecclesiastical History Containing an Account of the Controversies in Religion; The Lives and Writings of Ecclesiastical Authors; An Abridgment of their Works and a Judgement on their Style and Doctrine: Also A Compendious History of the Councils and All Affairs Transacted in the Church" by Lewis Ellies Du Pin, Doctor of the Sorbon (1699 Edition in English, translated from the Original French)

"A New Ecclesiastical History"

Lewis Ellies Du Pin
(Doctor of the Sorbon)

1699 Edition in English
Translated from French

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A New Ecclesiastical History Containing an Account of the Controversies in Religion; The Lives and Writings of Ecclesiastical Authors; An Abridgment of their Works and a Judgement on their Style and Doctrine: Also A Compendious History of the Councils and All Affairs Transacted in the Church by Lewis Ellies Du Pin, Doctor of the Sorbon (1699 Edition in English)

ON THE RIGHT OF THE LAITY TO POSSESS AND READ THE BIBLE: "The Fourteenth (Canon of the Council of Toulouse, 1229) prohibits Laicks from having the Books of the Old or New-Testament, unless it be a Psalter or a Breviary, and the Rosary, and does not permit them so much as to Translate them into the Vulgar tongue."

"A New Ecclesiastical History

Containing an Account of the Controversies in Religion; The Lives and Writings of Ecclesiastical Authors; An Abridgment of their Works and a Judgement on their Style and Doctrine: Also A Compendious History of the Councils and All Affairs Transacted in the Church"

by Lewis Ellies Du Pin

Doctor of the Sorbon

1699 Edition in English

Translated from the Original French

Edited & Updated by HAIL & FIRE 2009

The Council of Toulouse in the Year 1229.

Raimond Junior Count of Toulouse having made his peace with King Saint Lewis, and being returned to his estates, Romanus, Cardinal of St. Angelo, Legate of the Holy See, followed him in order completely to destroy Heresy in that country, and held there a Council in the Year 1229, which began in July and ended in November, at which were present Peter Amelli, Arch-Bishop of Narbonne, Gerard of Malemort, Arch-Bishop of Bourdeaux, and Amaneus, Arch-Bishop of Ausche, and several Bishops of those Provinces: the Counts of Toulouse and the other Barons and Lords of the Country, except the Count of Foix, were likewise there, with the Seneshall of Carcassonne and the two Consuls of Toulouse, who were to swear to and approve of the peace. The legate proceeded therein against several Heretics, reconciled several of them who recanted, and made forty-five Orders for the rooting out of Heresy.

In the First, he enjoins the Arch-Bishops and Bishops to settle in each parish a Priest and two or three approved Laicks [1] to make Inquisition after Heretics, and to engage them upon oath to use their utmost endeavors to find them out, to present them forthwith to the Bishop, and to the Lords or their Bailiffs.

In the Second, the same thing is enjoined to Abbots exempted with respect to the places where they have jurisdiction.

In the Third, the Lords of the respective places are recommended to search after Heretics, and to ruin the places whither they resort.

In the Fourth, there is added the Penalty of Losing their Estates, against those who know that a Heretic lives in their territories and will suffer it. And with respect to those who shall neglect to make Inquisition after them, it is ordered in the next Canon, that they shall likewise be punished for their neglect. The houses where Heretics shall be found are not so much as spared; and in the Sixth Canon, it is declared that they shall be destroyed, and that the ground shall be confiscated. The Bailiffs are condemned to the loss of their Offices and Estates, who shall be careless and negligent in searching after Heretics.

But to prevent the abuse that might be made of these Constitutions, in making those pass for Heretics who were not so; it is ordered in the Eighth, that no person shall be condemned as an Heretic, who has not been judged to be one by the Bishop of the place.

The Ninth gives leave to the Lords and their Officers to apprehend Heretics upon the territories of other Lords.

The Tenth imports, that the Heretics who voluntarily recant, shall not remain in the Villages where they were, if they are suspected of Heresy, but shall be transported into other Catholic Villages, which are free from suspicion; that they shall wear two crosses on their cloths, and have Certificates from their Bishops of their being Reconciled: that they shall not be admitted any more into Public Offices, nor do any Public Act till they shall have been qualified for it again by the Pope or his Legate.

In the Eleventh, it is ordered with respect to those who are converted by the fear of death, or for some other such account, that they shall be shut up in a Walled Place, that so they may not corrupt others.

The Twelfth imports that all men above fourteen years old, and all women above twelve shall make an abjuration of all sorts of Heresy, and a Profession of the Faith of the Roman Church, and that they shall be engaged to persecute Heretics.

In the Thirteenth it is ordered, that all persons who have the use of their reason, shall Confess themselves twice a year to their own proper Priest, and receive the Sacrament of the Eucharist at Christmas, Easter and Whitsuntide, so that Confession shall go before the Communion, unless the Priest think fit for some just cause, that they should abstain one time from receiving the Eucharist, and that those who shall abstain from it upon other accounts, shall be suspected of Heresy.

The Fourteenth prohibits Laicks from having the Books of the Old or New-Testament, unless it be a Psalter or a Breviary, and the Rosary, and does not permit them so much as to Translate them into the Vulgar tongue. This restraint was doubtless founded on that frequent abuse which was made of them in that country.

In the Fifteenth, they who are suspected of Heresy are prohibited the practice of Physic [2], and Heretics are forbidden to come near the sick, after they have received the Viaticum.

The Sixteenth orders, that the Last Wills and Testaments shall be received by the Curates.

The Seventeenth prohibits the Prelates and Barons from bestowing Offices which depended on them on Heretics, and from having for their domestics suspected persons, or of an ill reputation.

The Eighteenth declares those to be of a bad repute, who are notoriously infamous, or against whom persons of worth give in evidence.

The Nineteenth maintains the Churches and Religious Houses in their Privileges, and orders the entire payment of Tithes.

The Twentieth prohibits the laying any Tax on the Clergy.

The Twenty-first discharges them from all manner of Tributes and new Duties, and extends this favor to the Monks and Pilgrims, provided they do not concern themselves in merchandise.

The Twenty-second obliges those who receive Taxes, to take care of the high-ways, and makes them responsible for the robberies committed between sun and sun.

The Twenty-third forbids Laicks from laying any Tax on the Servants of Churches or of Church-Men, if they do not hold any estate of them.

The Twenty-fourth orders. that if any person shall throw a Clergy-Man into prison, even though he has not the Tonsure, the Bishop shall be acquainted of it: that the Lay Judge shall be obliged to remit him into the Hands of the Ecclesiastical Judges, and that if he refuse to do it, he shall be declared Excommunicated and forced to deliver him up by his Lord.

The Twenty-fifth orders all the Masters and Mistresses of every house, every Sunday and Holyday to be at Church, to hear the Preaching and Divine Service, and not to go out till Mass be quite over: that if they both cannot be there, one of them shall, and that if both miss without being sick, or having any lawful excuse, they shall be obliged to pay twelve French Deniers; one Moiety whereof shall go to the Lord, and the other to the Priest and the Church. They are likewise recommended to go to Church on Saturday-Nights in Honor of the Virgin Mary.

The Twenty-sixth contains the Catalogue of the Festivals, which are as follow: Christmas Day, the Feasts of St. Stephen, of St. John the Evangelist, of the Holy Innocents, of St. Sylvester, of the Circumcision, of the Epiphany, of the Purification, of the Annunciation, of the Assumption, of the Nativity of the Virgin Mary, Easter-Day, and the two next Days, the three Rogation-Days, Whitsunday and the two following Days, the Nativity of St. John Baptist, the Invention and Exaltation of the Holy Cross, the Feasts of the Twelve Disciples, of St. Mary Magdalen, of St. Lawrence, of St. Martin, of St. Nicholas, of the Dedication of St. Michael, the Dedication of each Church, the Feast of the Holy Patron and every Sunday.

In the Twenty-seventh it is ordered, that during all those Festivals, they shall abstain from all manner of work according to custom, and according to the Order which shall be prescribed by the Bishop, and that the Curates shall give notice of them every Sunday at Mass.

The other Canons relate to the observing of peace, and contain Orders for civil affairs.

FOOTNOTES:

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[1] Laicks: Latin laicus, laymen (H&F).

[2] Physic: The art of healing diseases (H&F).

more to come ...



"And he had power to give life unto the image of the beast, that the image of the beast should both speak, and cause that as many as would not worship the image of the beast should be killed. And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads: And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name." Revelation 13:15-17 KJV
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