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The Hail & Fire Audio Library is a FREE online resource for MP3 Audio Books. Listen online using the H&F Audio Player or download the MP3 audio files to your computer, iPod or portable player.

These books and sermons have been selected for the purity of their Gospel message and for the various authors' witness to the power of the Gospel, of repentance, and of a new life. It is always to be remembered that every writer is but a fallible man and an earthern vessel and we, therefore, must test all things (1 Thes 5:21) against the pure light of Scripture: "all Scripture, is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, thoroughly equipped for every good work," (2 Timothy 3:16).

The main theme of each of these works is the absolute necessity of godliness; for, as Scriptures declares, "pursue peace with all men, and holiness, without which no man shall see the Lord," (Hebrews 12:14).

JULY 18, 2013

HOME | LIBRARY: AUDIO | JOHN BUNYAN (1628-1688)

AUDIO LIBRARY: JOHN BUNYAN (1628-1688)

ABOUT: John Bunyan (1628 - 1688 ad), Protestant Christian Preacher, Nonconformist and author of that famous work, "The Pilgrim's Progress." Bunyan was born in England in 1628; a year memorable as that in which the Bill of Rights was passed. Then began the struggle against arbitrary power, which was overthrown in 1688, the year of Bunyan's death, by the accession of William III. Of Bunyan's parents, his infancy, and childhood, little is recorded. All that we know is from his own account, and that principally contained in his doctrine of the Law and Grace, and in his extraordinary development of his spiritual life, under the title of "Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners."

He entered this world in a laborer's cottage of the humblest class, at the village of Elstow, about a mile from Bedford. His pedigree is thus narrated by himself: "My descent was of a low and inconsiderable generation, my father's house being of that rank that is meanest and most despised of all the families in the land." With gratitude Bunyan records, that "it pleased God to put it into their hearts to put me to school to learn both to read and to write." To this charity Bunyan was for a short period indebted; but, alas, evil associates made awful havoc of those slight unshapen literary impressions and he says, "To my shame, I confess I did

 

soon lose that little I learned, and that almost utterly."

As soon as his strength enabled him, he devoted his whole soul and body to licentiousness: "As for my own natural life, for the time that I was without God in the world, it was indeed according to the course of this world, and the spirit that now worketh in the children of disobedience. It was my delight to be taken captive by the devil at his will: being filled with all unrighteousness; that from a child I had but few equals, both for cursing, swearing, lying, and blaspheming the holy name of God." Upon one occasion, when severely reproved for swearing, he says, "I wished, with all my heart, that I might be a little child again, that my father might learn me to speak without this wicked way of swearing."

In the midst of all this violent depravity, the Holy Spirit began the work of regeneration in his soul—a long, a solemn, yea, an awful work—which was to fit this poor debauched youth for purity of conduct, for communion with heaven, for wondrous usefulness as a minister of the gospel, for patient endurance of sufferings for righteousness' sake, for the writing of works which promise to be a blessing to the Church in all ages.

Abridged excerpt from "Memoir of John Bunyan".

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Take heed of evil examples among the godly; learn of no man to do that which the word of God forbids. Sometimes Satan makes use of a good manís bad ways, to spoil and harden the heart of them that come after. Peterís false doing had like to have spoiled Barnabas, yea, and several others more. Wherefore take heed of men, of good menís ways, and measure both theirs and thine own by no other rule but the holy Word of God. [Galatians 2:11-13]. ~ John Bunyan


MP3 AUDIO BOOKS: Listen online or download FREE mp3 audios of the works and writings of John Bunyan:

The Pilgrim's Progress by John Bunyan:

John Bunyan wrote the first part of "The Pilgrim's Progress, From this World to that which is to Come," during his twelve year imprisionment as a Nonconformist. The allegorical story is written "in the similitude of a dream" and begins with the awakened and repentant sinner, "Christian," seeking to escape the City of Destruction. Listen to or read more about the book below.

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MP3 File Size: 14.1 MB
Run Time: 49:16

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play or download mp3 audio book file Part 2

MP3 File Size: 12.5 MB
Run Time: 43:45

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MP3 File Size: 12.5 MB
Run Time: 43:53

play or download mp3 audio book file Part 4

MP3 File Size: 13.7 MB
Run Time: 47:53

play or download mp3 audio book file Part 5

MP3 File Size: 14.2 MB
Run Time: 49:53

play or download mp3 audio book file Part 6

MP3 File Size: 14.3 MB
Run Time: 50.14

play or download mp3 audio book file Part 7

MP3 File Size: 18 MB
Run Time: 01:02:53

Excerpt (beginning of Part 1):  "As I walked through the wilderness of this world, I lighted on a certain place where was a Den, and I laid me down in that place to sleep: and, as I slept, I dreamed a dream. I dreamed, and behold, I saw a man clothed with rags, standing in a certain place, with his face from his own house, a book in his hand, and a great burden upon his back. I looked, and saw him open the book, and read therein; and, as he read, he wept, and trembled; and, not being able longer to contain, he brake out with a lamentable cry, saying, 'What shall I do?'

"Now, I saw, upon a time, when he was walking in the fields, that he was, as he was wont, reading in his book, and greatly distressed in his mind; and, as he read, he burst out, as he had done before, crying, 'What shall I do to be saved?'"

In this plight, therefore, he went home and refrained himself as long as he could, that his wife and children should not perceive his distress; but he could not be silent long, because that his trouble increased. Wherefore at length he brake his mind to his wife and children; and thus he began to talk to them: 'Oh my dear wife, said he, and you the children of my bowels, I, your dear friend, am in myself undone by reason of a burden that lieth hard upon me; moreover, I am for certain informed that this our city will be burned with fire from heaven; in which fearful overthrow, both myself, with thee my wife, and you my sweet babes, shall miserably come to ruin, except (the which yet I see not) some way of escape can be found, whereby we may be delivered.'

At this his relations were sore amazed; not for that they believed that what he had said to them was true, but because they thought that some frenzy distemper had got into his head; therefore, it drawing towards night, and they hoping that sleep might settle his brains, with all haste they got him to bed. But the night was as troublesome to him as the day; wherefore, instead of sleeping, he spent it in sighs and tears. So, when the morning was come, they would know how he did. He told them, Worse and worse: he also set to talking to them again; but they began to be hardened. They also thought to drive away his distemper by harsh and surly carriages to him; sometimes they would deride, sometimes they would chide, and sometimes they would quite neglect him. Wherefore he began to retire himself to his chamber, to pray for and pity them, and also to condole his own misery; he would also walk solitarily in the fields, sometimes reading, and sometimes praying: and thus for some days he spent his time.

Now, I saw, upon a time, when he was walking in the fields, that he was, as he was wont, reading in his book, and greatly distressed in his mind; and, as he read, he burst out, as he had done before, crying, 'What shall I do to be saved?'

"Then he gave him a parchment roll, and there was written within, 'Flee from the wrath to come.'"

I saw also that he looked this way and that way, as if he would run; yet he stood still, because, as I perceived, he could not tell which way to go. I looked then, and saw a man named Evangelist coming to him and asked, 'Wherefore dost thou cry?' He answered, 'Sir, I perceive by the book in my hand, that I am condemned to die, and after that to come to judgement; and I find that I am not willing to do the first, nor able to do the second.' Then said Evangelist, 'Why not willing to die, since this life is attended with so many evils?' The man answered, 'Because I fear that this burden is upon my back will sink me lower than the grave, and I shall fall into Tophet. And, Sir, if I be not fit to go to prison, I am not fit, I am sure, to go to judgement, and from thence to execution; and the thoughts of these things make me cry.' Then said Evangelist, 'If this be thy condition, why standest thou still?' He answered, 'Because I know not whither to go.' Then he gave him a parchment roll, and there was written within, 'Flee from the wrath to come.'

The man therefore read it, and looking upon Evangelist very carefully, said, 'Whither must I fly?' Then said Evangelist, pointing with his finger over a very wide field, 'Do you see yonder wicket-gate?' The man said, 'No.' Then said the other, 'Do you see yonder shining light?' He said, 'I think I do.' Then said Evangelist, 'Keep that light in your eye, and go up directly thereto: so shalt thou see the gate; at which, when thou knockest, it shall be told thee what thou shalt do.'

So I saw in my dream that the man began to run. Now, he had not run far from his own door, but his wife and children, perceiving it, began to cry after him to return; but the man put his fingers in his ears, and ran on, crying, 'Life! life! eternal life!' So he looked not behind him, but fled towards the middle of the plain.

"'What!' said Obstinate, 'and leave our friends and our comforts behind us?'"

The neighbours also came out to see him run; and, as he ran, some mocked, others threatened, and some cried after him to return; and, among those that did so, there were two that resolved to fetch him back by force. The name of the one was Obstinate and the name of the other Pliable. Now, by this time, the man was got a good distance from them; but, however, they were resolved to pursue him, which they did, and in a little time they overtook him. Then said the man, 'Neighbours, wherefore are ye come?' They said, 'To persuade you to go back with us.' But he said, 'That can by no means be; you dwell, said he, in the City of Destruction, the place also where I was born: I see it to be so; and, dying there, sooner or later, you will sink lower than the grave, into a place that burns with fire and brimstone: be content, good neighbours, and go along with me.'

Obstinate. 'What!' said Obstinate, 'and leave our friends and our comforts behind us?'

Christian. 'Yes,' said Christian, 'for that was his name, because that ALL which you shall forsake is not worthy to be compared with a little of that which I am seeking to enjoy; and, if you will go along with me, and hold it, you shall fare as I myself; for there, where I go, is enough and to spare. Come away, and prove my words.'

Obstinate. 'What are the things you seek, since you leave all the world to find them?'

"Christian. 'I seek an inheritance incorruptible, undefiled, and that fadeth not away.'"

Christian. 'I seek an inheritance incorruptible, undefiled, and that fadeth not away, and it is laid up in heaven, and safe there, to be bestowed, at the time appointed, on them that diligently seek it. Read it so, if you will, in my book.'

Obstinate. 'Tush!' said Obstinate, 'away with your book; will you go back with us or no?'

Christian. 'No, not I,' said the other, 'because I have laid my hand to the plough.'

Obstinate. 'Come, then, neighbour Pliable, let us turn again, and go home without him; there is a company of these crazy-headed coxcombs, that, when they take a fancy by the end, are wiser in their own eyes than seven men that can render a reason.'

Pliable. Then said Pliable, 'Donít revile; if what the good Christian says is true, the things he looks after are better than ours: my heart inclines to go with my neighbour.'

Obstinate. 'What! more fools still! Be ruled by me, and go back; who knows whither such a brain-sick fellow will lead you? Go back, go back, and be wise.'

Christian. 'Nay, but do thou come with thy neighbour, Pliable; there are such things to be had which I spoke of, and many more glorious besides. If you believe not me, read here in this book; and for the truth of what is expressed therein, behold, all is confirmed by the blood of Him that made it.'

Pliable. 'Well, neighbour Obstinate,' said Pliable, 'I begin to come to a point; I intend to go along with this good man, and to cast in my lot with him: but, my good companion, do you know the way to this desired place?'

Christian. 'I am directed by a man, whose name is Evangelist, to speed me to a little gate that is before us, where we shall receive instructions about the way.'

Pliable. 'Come, then, good neighbour, let us be going.' Then they went both together.

Obstinate. 'And I will go back to my place,' said Obstinate; 'I will be no companion of such misled, fantastical fellows.'

Now, I saw in my dream, that when Obstinate was gone back, Christian and Pliable went talking over the plain; and thus they began their discourse. ..." Excerpt taken from Part 1 of "The Pilgrim's Progress."


Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners by John Bunyan:

John Bunyan wrote "Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners" during his twelve year imprisionment as a Nonconformist. A continuation of Bunyan's life, beginning from where he left off and concluding with the time and manner of his death and burial, together with a brief character of Bunyan, was written by a friend and published four years after his decease. The full title of this combined work is, "Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners: In a faithful account of the life and death of John Bunyan. Or, a brief relation of the exceeding mercy of God in Christ to him. Namely, in His taking him out of the dunghill, and converting him to the faith of His blessed son Jesus Christ. Here is also particularly shewed, what sight of, and what troubles he had for sin; and also, what various temptations he hath met with, and how God hath carried him through them." Listen to or read more about the book below.

play or download mp3 audio book file ALL NEW VOICE! 2013 audio books feature H&F's new and improved digital voice! Preface

MP3 File Size: 2.4 MB
Run Time: 08:18

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play or download mp3 audio book file Part 1

MP3 File Size: 13.9 MB
Run Time: 48:37

play or download mp3 audio book file Part 2

MP3 File Size: 14 MB
Run Time: 49:10

play or download mp3 audio book file Part 3

MP3 File Size: 15.3 MB
Run Time: 53:36

play or download mp3 audio book file Part 4

MP3 File Size: 14.8 MB
Run Time: 51:48

play or download mp3 audio book file Part 5

MP3 File Size: 12.1 MB
Run Time: 42:34

play or download mp3 audio book file Conclusion

MP3 File Size: 27.1 MB
Run Time: 01:32:22

Excerpt (beginning of Part 1):  "In this my relation of the merciful working of God upon my soul, it will not be amiss, if in the first place, I do in a few words give you a hint of my pedigree, and manner of bringing up; that thereby the goodness and bounty of God towards me, may be the more advanced and magnified before the sons of men.

For my descent then, it was, as is well known by many, of a low and inconsiderable generation; my fatherís house being of that rank that is meanest, and most despised of all the families in the land. Wherefore, I have not here, as others, to boast of noble blood, or of any high-born state, according to

"As for my own natural life, for the time that I was without God in the world, it was, indeed, according to the course of this world and the spirit that now worketh in the children of disobedience. It was my delight to be 'taken captive by the devil at his will'."

the flesh; though, all things considered, I magnify the heavenly Majesty, for that by this door He brought me into the world, to partake of the grace and life that is in Christ by the gospel.

But yet, notwithstanding the meanness and inconsiderableness of my parents, it pleased God to put it into their hearts, to put me to school, to learn both to read and write; the which I also attained, according to the rate of other poor menís children: though, to my shame, I confess, I did soon lose that I had learned, even almost utterly, and that long before the Lord did work His gracious work of conversion upon my soul.

As for my own natural life, for the time that I was without God in the world, it was, indeed, according to the course of this world and the spirit that now worketh in the children of disobedience. It was my delight to be ďtaken captive by the devil at his willĒ; being filled with all unrighteousness; the which did also so strongly work, and put forth itself, both in my heart and life, and that from a child, that I had but few equals (especially considering my years, which were tender, being but few) both for cursing, swearing, lying, and blaspheming the holy name of God.

Yea, so settled and rooted was I in these things, that they became as a second nature to me; the which, as I have also with soberness considered since, did so offend the Lord, that even in my childhood he did scare and affrighten me with fearful dreams, and did terrify me with fearful visions. For often, after I have spent this and the other day in sin, I have in my bed been greatly afflicted, while asleep, with the apprehensions of devils and wicked spirits, who still, as I then thought, laboured to draw me away with them, of which I could never be rid.

Also I should, at these years, be greatly afflicted and troubled with the thoughts of the fearful torments of hell-fire; still fearing, that it would be my lot to be found at last among those devils and hellish fiends, who are there bound down with the chains and bonds of darkness, unto the judgment of the great day.

These things, I say, when I was but a child, but nine or ten years old, did so distress my soul, that then in the midst of my many sports and childish vanities, amidst my vain companions, I was often much cast down, and afflicted in my mind therewith, yet could I not let go my sins: yea, I was also then so overcome with despair of life and heaven, that I should often wish, either that there had been no hell, or that I had been a devil; supposing they were only tormentors; that if it must needs be, that I went thither, I might be rather a tormentor, than be tormented myself.

A while after those terrible dreams did leave me, which also I soon forgot; for my pleasures did quickly cut off the remembrance of them, as if they had never been: wherefore with more greediness, according to the strength of nature, I did still let loose the reins of my lust, and delighted in all transgressions against the law of God: so that until I came to the state of marriage, I was the very ringleader of all the youth that kept me company, in all manner of vice and ungodliness.

Yea, such prevalency had the lusts and fruits of the flesh in this poor soul of mine, that had not a miracle of precious grace prevented, I had not only perished by the stroke of eternal justice, but had also laid myself open, even to the stroke of those laws which bring some to disgrace and open shame before the face of the world.

In these days the thoughts of religion were very grievous to me; I could neither endure it myself, nor that any other should; so that when I have seen some read in those books that concerned Christian piety, it would be as it were a prison to me. Then I said unto God, Depart from me, for I desire not the knowledge of Thy ways. I was now void of all good consideration, heaven and hell were both out of sight and mind; and as for saving and damning, they were least in my thoughts. O Lord, Thou knowest my life, and my ways were not hid from Thee! ..." Excerpt taken from Part 1 of "Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners."


The Heavenly Footman by John Bunyan:

John Bunyan's "The Heavenly Footman, or, A Description of the Man that Gets to Heaven: with Directions How to Run So As to Obtain". Listen online, download or read more about the book below.

play or download mp3 audio book file ALL NEW VOICE! 2013 audio books feature H&F's new and improved digital voice! The Author's Epistle to all Slothful
and Careless People

MP3 File Size: 3.5 MB
Run Time: 12:05

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play or download mp3 audio book file Chapter 1

MP3 File Size: 4.12 MB
Run Time: 13:45

play or download mp3 audio book file Chapter 2

MP3 File Size: 12 MB
Run Time: 42:12

play or download mp3 audio book file Chapter 3

MP3 File Size: 2.8 MB
Run Time: 09:51

play or download mp3 audio book file Chapter 4

MP3 File Size: 6.5 MB
Run Time: 22:33

Excerpt (Author's Epistle):  "Solomon saith, that 'the desire of the slothful killeth him;' and if so, what will slothfulness itself do to those that entertain it? The proverb is, 'He that sleepeth in harvest is a son that causeth shame:' and this I dare be bold to say, no greater shame can befall a man, than to see that he hath fooled away his soul, and sinned away eternal life. And I am sure this is the next way to do it; namely, to be slothful; slothful, I say, in the work of salvation. The vineyard of the slothful man, in reference to the things of this life, is not fuller of briers, nettles, and stinking weeds, than he that is slothful for heaven, hath his heart full of heart choking and soul-damning sin.

"No greater shame can befall a man, than to see that he hath fooled away his soul, and sinned away eternal life."

Slothfulness hath these two evils: first, to neglect the time in which it should be getting heaven; and by that means doth, in the second place, bring in untimely repentance. I will warrant you, that he who should lose his soul in this world through slothfulness, will have no cause to be glad thereat, when he comes to hell. Slothfulness is usually accompanied with carelessness; and carelessness is for the most part begotten by senselessness; and senselessness doth again put fresh strength into slothfulness; and by this means the soul is left remediless. Slothfulness shutteth out Christ; slothfulness shameth the soul.

Slothfulness is condemned even by the feeblest of all the creatures. 'Go to the ant, thou sluggard, consider her ways and be wise.' 'The sluggard will not plow, by reason of the cold;' that is, he will not break up the fallow ground of his heart, because there must be some pains taken by him that will do it; 'therefore he shall beg in harvest;' that is, when the saints of God shall have their glorious heaven and happiness given to them; but the sluggard 'shall have nothing;' that is, be never the better for his crying for mercy; according to that in Matthew 25 10-12.

If you would know a sluggard in the things of heaven, compare him with one that is slothful in the things of this world. As 1. He that is slothful is loath to set about the work he should follow; so is he that is slothful for heaven. 2. He that is slothful, is one that is willing to make delays: so is he that is slothful for heaven. 3. He that is a sluggard, any small matter that cometh in between, he will make it a sufficient excuse to keep him off from plying his work; so it is also with him that is slothful for heaven. 4. He that is slothful doeth his work by the halves: and so it is with him that is slothful for heaven. He may almost, but he shall never altogether, obtain perfection of deliverance from hell; he may almost, but he shall never (without he mend) be altogether a saint. 5. They that are slothful do usually lose the season in which things are to be done: and thus it is also with them that are slothful for heaven; they miss the seasons of grace. And therefore, 6. They that are slothful have seldom, or never, good fruit; so also it will be with the soul-sluggard. 7. They that are slothful, are chid for the same: so also will Christ deal with those that are not active for him. 'Thou wicked and slothful servant! out of thine own mouth will I judge thee. Thou saidst I was thus, and thus; wherefore then gavest thou not my money to the bank? &c. Take the unprofitable servant, and cast him into utter darkness, where there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.'

What shall I say? 1. Time runs; and will ye be slothful? 2. Much of your lives are past; and will you be slothful? 3. Your souls are worth a thousand worlds; and will ye be slothful? 4. The day of death and judgment is at the door; and will ye be slothful? 5. The curse of God hangs over your heads; and will you be slothful? 6. Besides, the devils are earnest, laborious, and seek by all means every day, by every sin, to keep you out of heaven, and hinder you of salvation; and will you be slothful? 7. Also, your neighbors are diligent for things that will perish; and will you be slothful for things that will endure for ever? 8. Would you be willing to be damned for slothfulness? 9. Would you be willing the angels of God should neglect to fetch your souls away to heaven, when you lie a dying, and the devils stand by ready to scramble for them? 10. Was Christ slothful in the work of your redemption? 11. Are his ministers slothful in tendering this unto you? 12. And lastly, If all this will not move, I tell you God will not be slothful or negligent to damn you, (their damnation slumbereth not, 2 Peter 2 3;) nor will the devils neglect to fetch thee, nor hell neglect to shut its mouth upon thee.

Sluggard! art thou asleep still? Art thou resolved to sleep the sleep of death? Will neither tidings from heaven nor hell awake thee? Wilt thou say still, yet a little sleep, a little slumber, and a little folding of the arms to sleep? Wilt thou yet turn thyself in thy sloth, as the door is turned upon the hinges? O that I was one that was skilful in lamentation, and had but a yearning heart towards thee, how would I pity thee! how would I bemoan thee! O that I could with Jeremiah let my eyes run down with rivers of water for thee! Poor soul, lost soul, dying soul, what a hard heart have I that I cannot mourn for thee! If thou shouldst lose but a limb, a child, or a friend, it would not be so much; but poor man, it is THY SOUL! If it was to lie in hell but for a day, but for a year, nay, ten thousand years, it would (in comparison) be nothing; but O it is FOR EVER! What a soul-amazing word will that be, which saith, 'Depart from me, ye cursed, into EVERLASTING FIRE!' &c.

Objection. 'But if I should set in, and run as you would have me, then I must run from all my friends; for none of them are running that way.'

Answer. And if thou dost, thou wilt run into the bosom of Christ, and of God; and then what harm will that do thee?

Objection. 'But if I run this way, then I must run from all my sins.'

Answer. That is true indeed; yet if thou dost not, thou wilt run into hell fire.

Objection. 'But if I run this way, then I shall be hated, and lose the love of my friends and relations, and of those that I expect benefit from, or have reliance on, and I shall be mocked of all my neighbors.'

Answer. And if thou dost not, thou art sure to lose the love and favor of God and Christ, the benefits of heaven and glory, and be mocked of God for thy folly. "I will laugh at your calamity, and mock when your fear cometh." If thou wouldst not be hated and mocked then, take heed thou by thy folly dost not procure the displeasure and mockings of the great God; for his mocks and hatred will be terrible, because they will fall upon thee in terrible times, even when tribulation and anguish take hold on thee; which will be when death and judgment come, when all the men in the earth, and all the angels in heaven cannot help thee.

Objection. 'But surely I may begin this time enough, a year or two hence; may I not?'

Answer. First, Hast thou any lease of thy life? Did ever God tell thee thou shalt live half a year, or two months longer? Nay, it may be, thou mayst not live so long. And therefore, Secondly, Wilt thou be so sottish and unwise, as to venture thy soul upon a little uncertain time? Thirdly, Dost thou know whether the day of grace will last a week longer or no? For the day of grace is past with some before their life is ended; and if it should be so with thee, wouldst thou not say, 'O that I had begun to run before the day of grace had been past, and the gates of heaven shut against me!' But, Fourthly, If thou shouldst see any of thy neighbors neglect the making sure of either house or land to themselves, if they had it proffered to them, saying, 'Time enough hereafter,' when the time is uncertain; and besides, they do not know whether ever it will be proffered to them again, or no: I say, wouldst thou not call them fools? And if so, then dost thou think that thou art a wise man to let thy immortal soul hang over hell by a thread of uncertain time, which may soon be cut asunder by death?

But to speak plainly, all these are the words of a slothful spirit. Arise, man! be slothful no longer: set foot, and heart, and all, into the way of God, and run. The crown is at the end of the race. ..." Excerpt taken from the Author's Epistle of "The Heavenly Footman."


The Jerusalem Sinner Saved by John Bunyan:

John Bunyan's "The Jerusalem Sinner Saved, or, Good News for the vilest of Men". Listen online, download or read more about the book below.

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MP3 File Size: 5.79 MB
Run Time: 20:14

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play or download mp3 audio book file Part 2

MP3 File Size: 6.2 MB
Run Time: 21:42

play or download mp3 audio book file Part 3

MP3 File Size: 6.5 MB
Run Time: 22:44

play or download mp3 audio book file Part 4

MP3 File Size: 6.39 MB
Run Time: 22:21

play or download mp3 audio book file Part 5

MP3 File Size: 6.32 MB
Run Time: 22:04

play or download mp3 audio book file Part 6

MP3 File Size: 6.5 MB
Run Time: 22:44

play or download mp3 audio book file Part 7

MP3 File Size: 6.3 MB
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"He saved the thief, to encourage thieves to come to him for mercy; he saved Magdalen, to encourage other Magdalens to come to him for mercy; he saved Saul, to encourage Sauls to come to him for mercy; and this Paul himself doth say, 'For this cause,' saith he, 'I obtained mercy, that in me first Jesus Christ might shew forth all long-suffering for a pattern to them which should hereafter believe on him to life everlasting;' 1 Timothy 1:16."

Excerpt: "Wherefore as by the Jerusalem sinners, in saving them first, he had a design to provoke others to come to him for mercy, so the same design is here set on foot again, in his calling and converting the Ephesian sinners, 'That in the ages to come he might shew the exceeding riches of his grace,' says he, 'in his kindness towards us through Christ Jesus.' There is yet one hint behind. It is said that God saved these for his love; that is, as I think, for the setting forth, for the commendations of his love, for the advance of his love, in the hearts and minds of them that should come after. As who should say, God has had mercy upon, and been gracious to you, that he might shew to others, for their encouragement, that they have ground to come to him to be saved. When God saves one great sinner, it is to encourage another great sinner to come to him for mercy.

He saved the thief, to encourage thieves to come to him for mercy; he saved Magdalen, to encourage other Magdalens to come to him for mercy; he saved Saul, to encourage Sauls to come to him for mercy; and this Paul himself doth say, 'For this cause,' saith he, 'I obtained mercy, that in me first Jesus Christ might shew forth all long-suffering for a pattern to them which should hereafter believe on him to life everlasting;' 1 Timothy 1:16.

How plain are the words! Christ, in saving of me, has given to the world a pattern of his grace, that they might see and believe, and come, and be saved; that they that are to be born hereafter might believe on Jesus Christ to life everlasting.

But what was Paul? Why, he tells you himself; I am, says he, the chief of sinners: I was, says he, a blaspheme; a persecutor, an injurious person; but I obtained mercy; 1 Timothy 1:14 and 15. Ay, that is well for you, Paul; but what advantage have we thereby? Oh, very much, saith he; for, 'for this cause I obtained mercy, that in me first, Jesus Christ might shew all long-suffering for a pattern to them which shall believe on him to life everlasting.'

Thus, therefore, you see that this third reason is of strength, namely, that Jesus Christ would have mercy offered in the first place to the biggest sinners, because, by their forgiveness and salvation, others, hearing of it, will be encouraged the more to come to him for mercy.

It may well therefore be said to God, Thou delightest in mercy, and mercy pleases thee; Micah 7:18. But who believes that this was God's design in shewing mercy of old--namely, that we that come after might take courage to come to him for mercy; or that Jesus Christ would have mercy offered in the first place to the biggest sinners, to stir up others to come to him for life? This is not the manner of men, O God!

But David saw this betimes; therefore he makes this one argument with God, that he would blot out his transgressions, that he would forgive his adultery, his murders, and horrible hypocrisy. Do it, O Lord, saith he, do it, and 'then will I teach transgressors thy ways, and sinners shall be converted unto thee;' Psalm 51:7-13.

He knew that the conversion of sinners would be a work highly pleasing to God, as being that which he had designed before he made mountain or hill: wherefore he comes, and he saith, Save me, O Lord; if thou wilt but save me, I will fall in with thy design; I will help to bring what sinners to thee I can. And, Lord, I am willing to be made a preacher myself; for that I have been a horrible sinner: wherefore, if thou shalt forgive my great transgressions, I shall be a fit man to tell of thy wondrous grace to others. Yea, Lord, I dare promise, that if thou wilt have mercy upon me, it shall tend to the glory of thy grace, and also to the increase of thy kingdom; for I will tell it, and sinners will hear on't. And there is nothing so suiteth with the hearing sinner as mercy, and to be informed that God is willing to bestow it upon him. 'I will teach transgressors thy ways, and sinners shall be converted unto thee.'

Nor will Christ Jesus miss of his design in proffering of mercy in the first place to the biggest sinners. You know what work the Lord, by laying hold of the woman of Samaria, made among the people there. They knew that she was a town sinner, an adulteress, yea, one that after the most audacious manner lived in uncleanness with a man that was not her husband: but when she, from a turn upon her heart, went into the city, and said to her neighbours, 'Come,' Oh how they came! how they flocked out of the city to Jesus Christ! 'Then they went out of the city, and came to him.' 'And many of the Samaritans (people perhaps as bad as herself) believed on him, for the saying of the woman, which testified, saying, he told me all that ever I did;' John 4:39.

That word, 'He told me all that ever I did,' was a great argument with them; for by that they gathered, that though he knew her to be vile, yet he did not despise her, nor refuse to shew how willing he was to communicate his grace unto her; and this fetched over, first her, then them.

This woman, as I said, was a Samaritan sinner, a sinner of the worst complexion: for the Jews abhorred to have ought to do with them, ver. 9; wherefore none more fit than she to be made one of the decoys of heaven, to bring others of these Samaritan wild-fowls under the net of the grace of Christ. And she did the work to purpose. Many, and many more of the Samaritans believed on him; verse 40-42. The heart of man, though set on sin, will, when it comes once to a persuasion that God is willing to have mercy upon us, incline to come to Jesus Christ for life.

Witness those turn-aways from God that you also read of in Jeremiah; for after they had heard three or four times over, that God had mercy for backsliders, they broke out, and said, 'Behold, we come unto thee, for thou art the Lord our God.' Or as those in Hosea did, 'For in thee the fatherless find mercy;' Jeremiah 3:22; Hosea 14:1-3.

Mercy, and the revelation thereof, is the only antidote against sin. It is of a thawing nature; it will loose the heart that is frozen up in sin; yea, it will make the unwilling willing to come to Jesus Christ for life. Wherefore, do you think, was it that Jesus Christ told the adulterous woman, and that before so many sinners, that he had not condemned her, but to allure her, with them there present, to hope to find favour at his hands? (As he also saith in another place, 'I came not to judge, but to save the world.') For might they not thence most rationally conclude, that if Jesus Christ had rather save than damn an harlot, there was encouragement for them to come to him for mercy." Excerpt taken from "The Jerusalem Sinner Saved."